Royal Blue
 

 
Thoughts of a writer, wife, mother, PhD, sister, crafty chick, program coordinator, homeowner, culture vulture, bibliophile, and blogger.
 
 
   
 
Friday, April 04, 2003
 
Hello, Blogger? Testing 1-2-3. Why am I having trouble posting???
 

Curly Girlie

Molly gets lots of compliments on her naturally curly hair, which is also this kind of dirty blonde color. It's pretty cute and kind of cherub-like.

Before she was born, Ed was convinced that Molly would inherit my naturally curly hair and his hazel-green eyes and sure enough, she did.

I see her curly hair with such mixed emotions. Mixed because it is so darn cute and adorable but I also know what it is like to grow up with curly hair when the ''norm' is long, straight hair that you'll never have.

I have thick, very curly (but not frizzy, I'm happy to say) hair that I really like (for the most part now), but it took me years to come to terms with.

Most people think I'm so lucky to have naturally curly hair and what could be bad about it? Well, it's pretty limiting in terms of my hairstyles. I can either wear it short or wait a loooong time and try to grow it out. The problem is my hair doesn't grow "down" as it gets longer, it grows "out," so trying to have something "in between' short or long is pretty much impossible, unless I have it professionally straightened or whatever. Imagine a clown trying to grow his or her hair out and you pretty much have a picture of what it would be like for me.

Of course, on the upside, I never have to blow it dry, perm it or mess with it to have a hairstyle. I just have to have a good cut, wash it and then it let it do its thing. I spend maybe 5 minutes a day on my hair and that includes washing it, so I am lucky in that regard. Trying to grow it out (and I've tried it several times over the years) is maddening. I'll never have long or even shoulder-length hair without a serious commitment to chemicals.

However, growing up and wanting to "have hairstyles" and experiment and stuff was hard b/c my hair does not obey any rules except its own. So, I really battled my hair until I graduated from college and then learned to work with it.

Therefore, I look at my daughter and I love her curls because they are so wonderful and make her unique, but I also feel a pang because I know what she will struggle with as she gets older and wants to look just like Barbie or her girlfriends who will have long, straight shiny hair (at least most of them).

Since I stopped struggling with my hair and learned to make peace with it and actually love it sometimes, I've found a kinship with my girlfriends who have naturally curly hair--the "Curly Girlies" as we sometimes refer to each other.

I think my real challenge is to help Molly learn make peace with her hair as she goes through the phases of girlhood and young adulthood until she can really learn to love it.

I guess it's like so many of those qualities we inherit from our mothers--we learn to come to love them because they are forever part of who we are, rather than resent them for making us "different" than what we think we "should" be.

Wednesday, April 02, 2003
 
Curly Girlie

Molly gets lots of compliments on her naturally curly hair, which is also this kind of dirty blonde color. It's pretty cute and kind of cherub-like.

Before she was born, Ed was convinced that Molly would inherit my naturally curly hair and his hazel-green eyes and sure enough, she did.

I see her curly hair with such mixed emotions. Mixed because it is so darn cute and adorable but I also know what it is like to grow up with curly hair when the ''norm' is long, straight hair that you'll never have.

I have thick, very curly (but not frizzy, I'm happy to say) hair that I really like (for the most part now), but it took me years to come to terms with.

Most people think I'm so lucky to have naturally curly hair and what could be bad about it? Well, it's pretty limiting in terms of my hairstyles. I can either wear it short or wait a loooong time and try to grow it out. The problem is my hair doesn't grow "down" as it gets longer, it grows "out," so trying to have something "in between' short or long is pretty much impossible, unless I have it professionally straightened or whatever. Imagine a clown trying to grow his or her hair out and you pretty much have a picture of what it would be like for me.

Of course, on the upside, I never have to blow it dry, perm it or mess with it to have a hairstyle. I just have to have a good cut, wash it and then it let it do its thing. I spend maybe 5 minutes a day on my hair and that includes washing it, so I am lucky in that regard. Trying to grow it out (and I've tried it several times over the years) is maddening. I'll never have long or even shoulder-length hair without a serious commitment to chemicals.

However, growing up and wanting to "have hairstyles" and experiment and stuff was hard b/c my hair does not obey any rules except its own. So, I really battled my hair until I graduated from college and then learned to work with it.

Therefore, I look at my daughter and I love her curls because they are so wonderful and make her unique, but I also feel a pang because I know what she will struggle with as she gets older and wants to look just like Barbie or her girlfriends who will have long, straight shiny hair (at least most of them).

Since I stopped struggling with my hair and learned to make peace with it and actually love it sometimes, I've found a kinship with my girlfriends who have naturally curly hair--the "Curly Girlies" as we sometimes refer to each other.

I think my real challenge is to help Molly learn make peace with her hair as she goes through the phases of girlhood and young adulthood until she can really learn to love it.

I guess it's like so many of those qualities we inherit from our mothers--we learn to come to love them because they are forever part of who we are, rather than resent them for making us "different" than what we think we "should" be.

Tuesday, April 01, 2003
 
Curly Girlie

Molly gets lots of compliments on her naturally curly hair, which is also this kind of dirty blonde color. It's pretty cute and kind of cherub-like!

Before she was born, Ed was convinced that Molly would inherit my naturally curly hair and his hazel-green eyes and sure enough, she did.

I see her curly hair with such mixed emotions. Mixed because it is so darn cute and adorable but I also know what it is like to grow up with curly hair when the ''norm' is long, straight hair that you'll never have.

I have thick, very curly (but not frizzy, I'm happy to say) hair that I really like (for the most part now), but it took me years to come to terms with.

Most people think I'm so lucky to have naturally curly hair and what could be bad about it? Well, it's pretty limiting in terms of my hairstyles. I can either wear it short or wait a loooong time and try to grow it out. The problem is my hair doesn't grow "down" as it gets longer, it grows "out," so trying to have something "in between' short or long is pretty much impossible, unless I have it professionally straightened or whatever. Imagine a clown trying to grow his or her hair out and you pretty much have a picture of what it would be like for me.

Of course, on the upside, I never have to blow it dry, perm it or mess with it to have a hairstyle. I just have to have a good cut, wash it and then it let it do its thing. I spend maybe 5 minutes a day on my hair and that includes washing it, so I am lucky in that regard. Trying to grow it out (and I've tried it several times over the years) is maddening. I'll never have long or even shoulder-length hair without a serious commitment to chemicals.

However, growing up and wanting to "have hairstyles" and experiment and stuff was hard b/c my hair does not obey any rules except its own. So, I really battled my hair until I graduated from college and then learned to work with it.

Therefore, I look at my daughter and I love her curls because they are so wonderful and make her unique, but I also feel a pang because I know what she will struggle with as she gets older and wants to look just like Barbie or her girlfriends who will have long, straight shiny hair (at least most of them).

Since I stopped struggling with my hair and learned to make peace with it and actually love it sometimes, I've found a kinship with my girlfriends who have naturally curly hair--the "Curly Girlies" as we sometimes refer to each other.

I think my real challenge is to help Molly learn make peace with her hair as she goes through the phases of girlhood and young adulthood until she can really learn to love it.

I guess it's like so many of those qualities we inherit from our mothers--we learn to come to love them because they are forever part of who we are, rather than resent them for making us "different" than what we think we "should" be.

Monday, March 31, 2003
 
It's All About Money

Two weeks ago we found out that our taxes are going up and therefore our mortgage will go up over $100 a month. Now, this was very unhappy news. We already live in a ridiculously expensive little city that is only holding me for this long because the nearby cute little towns don't have the stellar school districts that we have.

So, we have to cut back, even though our budget is already pretty pared down to begin with (okay, don't count that last Clinique purchase, even though it was bonus week). With kid #2 about to arrive, we were going to have to pare down even more and now this! I'm not happy! How will we manage?

Back in December we decided to have a "take out" dinner night only one night a week, rather than two. (we go out to dinner about once a month when we get a free babysitter aka family members). That has helped. A friend gave me an annual membership to Sam's Club for my birthday and we are saving money on diapers like you wouldn't believe, so that's good.

So, I've been forced to get even more creative with saving money. I'm shopping at the local thrift and discount places and finding incredible bargains. I found a homemade quilt rack with hearts carved on it and a tiny shelf that is perfect for Molly's room and it was $2 at the thrift store!! A friend made Molly a quilt when she was a baby and I didn't have the heart to let her use it and get it dirty and so now we can display it in her new room with a little teddy bear sitting on the shelf above it. Too cute!!

Then, Sunday, i stopped by Once Upon a Child and spied a double stroller for $20!! What luck! It is in great shape!
I was starting to think I'd have to buy one on ebay and dreading the shipping on that. Plus, we're not really going to use it for that long, and so I refused to pay full price for it anyway.

The key is to shop for a bargain for items that you don't need immediately, b/c it allows you to keep looking and shopping until you find it. The downside is that it takes time.

I've also starting haunting the dollar store near our Kroger's. I have found some amazing deals, there, too. Just very basic stuff like plastic containers or plastic squirt bottles, but el cheapo. So, I'm getting good at this bargain shopping thing. I guess it's the only way that we'll be able to get by after baby arrives.

We have a really nice cushion of savings but we have to actually "SAVE" that rather than use it to live on, which is what we used to do.

My mom once gave my great advice when i started grad school and my income was really low. She said to make your 'second job' be all about shopping for bargains, clipping coupons, etc. Rather than actually get a second job, use that time and energy toward stretching your current income. What great advice. I hope I can learn to do that more and more.

Oh, yeah, we decided to shop for cheaper cable TV options, too. I will cry if I have to give up HBO, but it really is a luxury. Pout.

 

 
   
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